TRAVEL

VINTAGE EDITIONS: Two Italian Boutiques Putting a Spin on Collectables

This article first appeared in Le Miami, December 2017.

PierLuigi – via Sperastudio

Beanie babies; Polly Pockets; Pokémon. Remember the satisfaction of drawers filled with all the right cards? Of shelves lined with all the right dolls? And of bragging rights to having the best collection on the block?  There’s something about a collection that makes you feel at home – probably because every single object was hand-picked and personally chosen. Now imagine that you’re making your collection into a home… Or better: a boutique hotel.

For restauranteur Lorenzo Lisi, his favourite collectable is wine – and with preferences to a 1970s Chateauneuf du Pape or a great Barolo, when he decided to renovate an early eighteenth century palazzo in Rome’s Campo de’ Fiori neighbourhood into a hotel, he looked no further than the cantina at family restaurant, PierLuigi.

The 1,700-plus labels on the wine list are a composite of life moments as simple as a great dinner with friends, or a celebration for a new job or baby.  “Wine has always been tied to the story of man. If you think about it, wine is a constant in every phase of the celebration of life”, says Lisi, a sentiment that led him to establish the city’s (and Italy’s) first wine hotel.

Hotel de’ Ricci lobby sitting area – via Ebookers

Located on one of Rome’s historic Renaissance side streets, the eight-room Hotel de’ Ricci is a discreet hideaway in the city-centre.  And the wine celebration begins before stepping foot inside the brick townhouse.   Ricci’s 20-strong team of staff are expertly trained sommeliers who coordinate with guests to personalise wine experiences – from curated in-house wine bars (with Coravin devices to extract single glasses without uncorking) to vineyard visits with wine masters. And while you stay at the hotel, the sommeliers set up private tastings and evening apéritifs in the light-blue guests suites, where oversized vintage wine labels and original paintings by Andrea Ferolla intermingle with mid-century furniture.

Hotel de’ Ricci – via How To Spent It

As well as the on-site cantina lined abundantly with Italian and non-Italian labels, (looking for a Super Tuscan or the 1977 Chateau Lafite Rothschild Paulliac?), Lisi keeps the vibe local at the ground-level Charade bar, a Chez Dede-designed speakeasy that’s a favourite hangout for the guests – the kind of place where you’re likely to spot the neighbourhood archaeologist chatting away with the guys at Gucci.

Private charade bar at Hotel De’ Ricci – via TripAdvisor

Halfway to Florence on the A1 is countryside refuge Tenuta la Bandita, a refurbished farmhouse overlooking in the beautiful hills of Val d’Orcia and hinterlands of early Renaissance papal enclave, Pienza.  Like Lisi’s Hotel de’ Ricci, La Bandita has a subtle element of personality that sets it apart from the myriad of Tuscan villas and farmhouses that populate the countryside.  Music.  When owner John Voightman, a RCA/Sony Global Marketing veteran a made the move to Italy more than a decade ago, he brought 70 or so vinyls, culled from Voightman’s personal collection.

“Music is an experience”, muses Voightman, “it’s an expression of beauty, fun and joy”. Voightman’s LPs have become the literal and figurative centrepiece to the farmhouse, taking residence in its communal living area, an open-plan lounge perfect for a party. Displayed on custom-built shelves, the vinyls are meant to be looked over, played, and talked about it.  There’s switched out on occasion, and over the years, the collection has evolved from LPs Voightman’s personal collection to a mix of records accumulated from his guests’s contributions.

For the guests and Voightman, music is the nucleus of La Bandita country house and the townhouse, Bandita’s city counterpart. On any given evening, each property’s lounge is the scene where guests drop the needle on albums like 1970s Jose Feliciano jazz covers, John Lee Hooker, Meatloaf and Led Zeppelin, and spin conversation.

It’s all about vibe, and La Bandita has a great one.  The country house is an upgraded Under the Tuscan – where farmhouse walls are coated in a soft palettes of eggshell and ecrus and with natural stone floors. Meanwhile, following the same style as the town house, the interior décor is an effortless fusion of cool minimalism and rustic charm – and following in the same style is the Townhouse, a restored former convent in Pienza proper.  The hangout spaces are key – from its communal lounges and farm-to-table breakfasts, to Voightman’s wine cellar and vinyls.  It’s like that Italian rec room you never had with great tunes and wine, where your 10 besties meet up for a weekend of absolutely nothing.