TRAVEL

7 Rome Exhibitions You Don’t Want To Miss

This article was first published in Forbes Travel, December 2017.

he Canvas That Is Rome. Credit: patrizio1948

From monumental to peculiar, and ancient to contemporary, Rome has it all for art aficionados. And thankfully, there’s no better time than right now to traverse the Eternal City and catch up with these not-to-be-missed exhibitions.

History comes alive
If there is one thing ancient Rome was known for, it was making a colossal impression. And no emperor did it better than Trajan, whose two decades in the city expanded the empire beyond anyone’s wildest dreams.

Archaeological site Mercati di Traiano (Trajan’s markets) showcases the emperor’s imperial advances — from infrastructure and economic services to architectural and urban development — in “Trajan: Building the Empire, Creating Europe,” on display through September 9.

Peruse Picasso
Bring yourself back to the modern age by visiting “Picasso: Tra Cubismo e Classicismo 1915-1925” at the Scuderie del QuirinaleThe exhibit explores the fantastic mind of the artistic genius in a display of 100 works that visually catalog his 1917 Italian travels with playwright Jean Cocteau as they searched for inspiration by following Sergei Diaghilev’s touring ballet company throughout the country.

Drawings, watercolors, sketches and stage costumes on display through January 21 honor the centenary of their auspicious journey.

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Revel in the Renaissance
Through February 11, the beautiful and historic Palazzo Barberini plays host to “Arcimboldo,” an exhibition of 20 works by 16th-century Lombard painter Giuseppe Arcimboldi. His paintings are an exploration of creative portraiture using objects such as flowers, fruit and animals.  Accompanying Arcimboldi’s amazing efforts are 100 pieces by his contemporaries.

Meanwhile, across town, Galleria Borghese is celebrating its beloved Baroque artist Gian Lorenzo Bernini with 60 treasures that join the galleria’s already substantial collection of Bernini sculptures in a spectacular feature exhibition, on display through February 4. 

Check out contemporary culture
While Rome may be the world’s best open-air museum of ancient monuments and Baroque palaces, it is also a tiny hub of contemporary art. “Home Beirut. Sounding the Neighbors” is the third part of the internationally acclaimed Maxxi Museum’s series Interactions across the MediterraneanThe installment focuses on the contemporary art scene in Beirut, Lebanon, through four variants of the concept of “home” seen through the eyes of 36 artists, musicians, publishers, designers and filmmakers, on display through May 20. 

And for a different take on a museum experience, the tiny Chiostro del Bramante asks you to “Enjoy” art in an interactive exhibit of installations, optical illusions, paintings, sculptures and videos all meant to be played with. This amusing display is available through February 25.

Fornasetti At Palazzo Altemps. Credit: Palazzo Altemps

The best of both visual worlds
For a fun-and-fabulous mix of modern design, ancient art and Renaissance beauty, catch Fornasetti a Palazzo Altemps. Through May 6, be spellbound by art and design pieces from whimsical Italian artist/interior decorator Piero Fornasetti that intermingle with the Palazzo Altemps’ incredible collection of Greek and Roman sculpture displayed in the palace’s resplendently decorated Renaissance rooms.  

Umbria: 3 Picture-Perfect Day Trips From Rome

This article originally appeared in Forbes Travel, November 2017.

Perugia, Photo Credit: Erica Firpo

Rome may be the center of everything, but sometimes even the Eternal City needs a day off. When the air cools down and the colors ripen with autumn, the evergreen region of Umbria beckons with its beautiful countryside, art and cuisine. Take a step off the beaten Italian path and plan a day trip to one of these three picturesque cities.

PERUGIA
Hop on the train for a scenic two-and-a-half hour trip to the center of the country. Not only is the historic city of Perugia the capital of the Umbria region, it’s also so verdant that the area is known as the “Green Heart” of Italy.

A former Etruscan settlement, medieval stronghold and Renaissance city, Perugia is one of those examples of architectural and cultural palimpsest — a site literally built upon layers of history. Imposing fortress walls surround a historic center, which in itself is a magnificent maze of medieval streets and beautiful palazzos. Buried below its charming surface is an incredible subterranean time capsule of Roman and Etruscan structures.

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What to do there
Explore underground Perugia, starting with a guided tour of the excavated portion of the city’s San Lorenzo Cathedral in the Museo di San Lorenzo. Follow the trail of Pietro Vannucci (aka Perugino), Perugia’s most famous artist and former mentor to Raphael.

The San Severo Chapel, in the Church of San Severo, features a fresco painted by both master and pupil while the city’s National Gallery of Umbria has several paintings by the duo.

Perugia is also known as Chocolate City, home to Italy’s largest sweets manufacturer, Perugina. Plan to visit the Casa del Chocolate, a small museum dedicated to Perugina’s confectionary history and then live out an I Love Lucy fantasy with a chocolate-making class at the Baci Perugina School of Chocolate.

If your sweet tooth still isn’t satisfied, check out Eurochocolate, Europe’s largest festival dedicated to all things cocoa hosted in Perugia each fall.

Visit again just after the holiday season for the winter edition of Umbria Jazz, a world-renowned music fest (December 28 to January 1).

Between excursions, be sure to stop for a bite at Trattoria del Borgo, a farm-to-table restaurant that celebrates the best of the region’s local ingredients. Don’t miss the handmade strangozzi with pesto made with Umbrian wild herbs. Try to snag a table in the backyard — you won’t be sorry.

SPOLETO
Situated just one-and-a-half hours outside of Rome (by train), Spoleto is quite possibly the most picture-perfect of all Umbrian hill towns. With the snowy peaks of the Apennine Mountains as a backdrop, the magnificent medieval fortress town cuts an imposing figure in the lush green hills. The beautiful city is an architectural composite of its millennia-spanning history of Roman ruins, medieval walls, romanesque churches and more.

What to do there
Bring your walking shoes — this is one town you’ll want to explore from top to bottom. Spoletium was a Roman colony as early as 241 B.C., and the town still has traces of its ancient history.

Magnificent stone structures dating from the 1st century B.C. stand miraculously intact, including an amphitheater and arches — in particular the formidable Arch of Drusus and Germanicus, anachronistically spanning a narrow medieval street.

You can examine more delicate pieces of the city’s Roman history at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Spoleto

Strolling around the walled town inevitably leads to the Piazza Del Duomo, a magnificent open space anchored by a beautiful, light pink stone cathedral. During the summer months, the piazza becomes the scene for Festival di Spoleto, a popular outdoor celebration of Italian music, dance and opera. (Now you see where organizers of the famed Charleston arts festival of the same name get their inspiration.)

Nature lovers will want to traverse the Bridge of Towers, a 775-foot-long and nearly 300-foot-high stone structure on the outskirts of the city connecting to Monteluco. Then follow the Giro dei Condotti on a short panoramic walk around the hill.

TODI
Often described as Umbria’s most beautiful city, Todi is spectacular from the moment you see it on the road during the under-two-hour drive in through the Tiber valley. Like other hill towns, Todi sits on a peak overlooking the countryside, but for some reason the light seems to cast a more heavenly glow on the mountainside here. Perhaps that’s why the Romans took over this Etruscan stronghold.

The town itself is a labyrinth of narrow, cobbled streets leading to the Piazza del Popolo, a caffe-lined square whose main building, Palazzo del Popolo, is one of Italy’s oldest public structures.

What to do there
For most, just walking around Todi and eating delicious Umbrian delicacies is enough, but if you crave a taste of history and culture, plan a visit to the Museo Civico di Todi. This local museum bursts with paintings and antiquities that trace the town’s story from its Etruscan origins through the Renaissance.

More active types will want to delve into the city’s history with Underground Todi, a fascinating subterranean tour of tunnels and wells from the Etruscan, Roman and Medieval eras.

But no matter your interests, you won’t want to miss the Tempio di Santa Maria Consolazione (the Consolation Temple), designed in 1508 by superstar architect Donato Bramante. His church is built in a symmetric cross, surmounted by a dome and unique to the era.

5 Places For An Unforgettable Aperitivo

When Forbes Travel (October 2017) asked me to find great Italian aperitivi around the world, here's where I found myself barside. . .

The St. Regis Bangkok’ s Jojo, Photo Credit: The St. Regis Bangkok

Everyone loves a good happy hour, but no one does it quite like the Italians. Meant to cleanse the palate before dinner, drinks like a Negroni (Campari, gin and sweet vermouth) or an Aperol Spritz are light, refreshing and popular worldwide for their simple, classic flavors. Here are five stops to make for your own global apertivo adventure.

Bangkok
The Mediterranean comes to Thailand with Aperol evenings at Jojo, Forbes Travel Guide Four-Star The St. Regis Bangkok’s elegant Italian restaurant. The eatery’s terrace location is the spot to enjoy the futuristic and ever-changing Bangkok cityscape while imbibing Italy’s best cocktail-hour export, the Aperol Spritz — prosecco, Aperol and soda water.

To accompany your signature sip, chef Stefano Merlo has created perfectly paired cicchetti (traditional Venetian aperitif snacks).

Milan
When in Milan, the fashion forward flock to Four-Star Hotel Principe di Savoia and its iconic Principe Bar. Come aperitif time, this sultry hangout comes alive with signature martini cocktails (try the Raspberry Filtering, a sweet sip made with raspberry-infused vodka, Chambord, pineapple juice and a splash of champagne), a DJ spinning Italian tunes and canapés, in case you start to feel peckish.

Four Seasons Hotel Firenze, Photo Credit: Four Seasons Hotel Firenze

Florence
Take the fast train to Florence and the Atrium Bar at Five-Star Four Seasons Hotel Firenze, one of the prettiest places for an aperitivo. This elegant bar is old school — a Renaissance-era court with an enclosed skylight ceiling, whose design recalls vintage libraries and lounges of a bygone era.

Mixologist Edoardo Sandri expertly curates a cocktail menu that goes far beyond a quality aperitivo. Though you can’t go wrong with a classic Negroni Sbagliato (which swaps in sparkling wine for gin), a favorite sip here is the light and fresh cucumber martini.

New York City
Head to Four-Star Langham Place’s iconic Fifth Avenue address and walk up the grand marble staircase to Four-Star Ai Fiori’s bar for a little taste of Italy in Midtown Manhattan. Bar Fiori specializes in seasonal aperitivi, including a spicy twist on the Aperol Spritz — the Autumn Thistle features cardamom-infused Cynar (a bittersweet artichoke-based liqueur) and Cider du Vulcain Premiers Emois hard cider.

Chinotto Cobbler, Mattiussi Fizz and Americano in Paris all offer herbal and floral variations of their classic namesake sips, and each comes with a skillet of housemade popcorn.

Hotel Eden’s La Libreria, Photo Credit: Hotel Eden

Rome
When in Rome, it’s all about the view, and there is no other perch quite like the open-air terrace at Il Giardino atop Five-Star Hotel Eden. Take in a sweeping view of the Eternal City from the historic center toward Michelangelo’s Dome as barman Gabriele Rizzi creates signature, seasonal cocktails like his Grande Bellezza — a pink vermouth martini — accompanied by chef Fabio Ciervo’s artful hors d’oeuvres and cicchetti.

Here’s a secret: the ground-level gilded lobby lounge, La Libreria, has a hidden bar with a private barman. So, if you find yourself in need of an afternoon aperitivo, grab a spot on one of the velvet divans and wait to be served.

How to Improve Your Instagram Travel Shots

*This article first appeared in Endless Vacation, September 2017.

A Pro shares ways to up your game

 

With 56,000 followers watching her feed, travel writer and influencer Erica Firpo(@ericafirpo) knows how to make an Instagram post pop. We asked her to share her tips—follow the advice below to help reap likes, comments and Insta-envy.

Shoot It Like You Mean It

Hold the smartphone steady and with authority, making sure to align the camera perfectly parallel with the subject. Shoot horizontally for more range in the picture plane and then double up with vertical shots for your Instagram Stories.

 

Timing Is Everything

Early mornings and late afternoons, also known as the “golden hours,” are some of the best times to take photos because the light is warm and soft. For uncrowded shots, get up and out at sunrise to have the sites to yourself.

Get Some Perspective

Change up the vibe with a change of place. Head to higher ground for sweeping views, or kneel closer to the floor for action shots. My favorite, high or low, is to find a vanishing point for a stylized shot.

Keep It Natural

And as much as I like to frame a gorgeous golden ratio, great photos come when you don’t force the scene. Let the natural elements play out right in front of you, and shoot away. For help on where to shoot, you can research locations in advance with Google Earth and Instagram.

Nip/Tuck

Sometimes a little editing (like cropping, alignment and light and/or color correction) can upgrade a photo from nice to amazing. For Android* and iPhone,** I like Snapseed(iTunes/Android; free) for overall editing; VSCO(iTunes/Android; free) for its tilt-and-level tool (which helps with photo alignment); and A Color Story(iTunes/Android; free) for adjusting color balance. Editing rule of thumb: Be as authentic as possible.

Bonus Tip:Bring an external battery so you don’t miss out on a shot.Mophie(cases, from $60)makes cases that can extend battery life by more than 100 percent while protecting your smartphone.

Keeping up with Contemporary Rome

This article first appeared in Marriott Traveler, August 2017

You'll find street art on nearly every corner and every wall in Rome, especially in the Quadraro neighborhood. (Photo: Getty Images) 

You'll find street art on nearly every corner and every wall in Rome, especially in the Quadraro neighborhood. (Photo: Getty Images) 

The Eternal City’s 3,000-plus years of history are visible every time you walk its streets — turn any corner and it seems an ancient ruin rises before you. But lately it’s become apparent that Rome’s sidewalks are also dotted with more modern interests. 

Turn away for a spell from the city’s storied wonders and lean in to new museum and gallery initiatives — you may discover contemporary art as Rome’s newest wonder. 

The Museums

The MAXXI Museum is housed in Zaha Hadid’s concrete undulation in the Flaminio neighborhood. (Photo: Getty Images)  

The MAXXI Museum is housed in Zaha Hadid’s concrete undulation in the Flaminio neighborhood. (Photo: Getty Images)  

When in Rome, it’s not all about the old. Though the city has an incredible and limitless lineup of museums devoted to Italy’s ancient, medieval, Renaissance and Baroque art, the Eternal City keeps its eternal vibe with a dynamic modern and contemporary art scene.

La Galleria Nazionale, housed in a palace containing Italy’s main collection of post-unification Italian art, is dedicated to who’s who in Italian art, from neoclassicists, Macchiaioli and futurists to Arte Povera and contemporary artists.

In 2016 director Cristiana Collu revamped the century-old building and changed up the permanent collection to create a new interpretation in the nonlinear exhibition “Time Is Out of Joint.” Canova faces off with Twombly, while Clemente, Modigliani, Beecroft, Penone, Calder, Kandinsky, Duchamp, Pollock and Balla hang out.

For a full-on 21st-century focus, head to the MAXI Museum, Zaha Hadid’s concrete undulation in the Guido Reni district in the Flaminio neighborhood. MAXXI devotes its halls to work produced only in this century, with a permanent collection, temporary exhibitions and Italy’s largest modern architecture archive.

Museo MACRO is Rome’s only contemporary gallery and working studio space. (Photo: Getty Images) 

Museo MACRO is Rome’s only contemporary gallery and working studio space. (Photo: Getty Images) 

For a smaller step into contemporary, Museo MACRO is Rome’s only contemporary gallery and working studio space. Located in a former Peroni beer factory, MACRO hosts exhibitions as well as artists in situ. Also, keep an eye on the Palazzo delle Esposizioni, a temporary exhibition space that occasionally hosts contemporary art and photography shows.

 

The Galleries

La dolce vita refers to Rome’s heyday in the mid-1900s, when the city was a world’s stage of fashion, performance and art. Somehow that vitality took a slumber for a few decades, only to wake up, thanks, in part, to Gavin Brown.

The New York gallerist chose the “quiet” (i.e., southern) area of the Trastevere neighborhood for the Rome outpost of Gavin Brown’s Enterprise (GBE), one of his six art spaces that include spots in New York and Los Angeles. Brown wowed the art world by choosing Sant’Andrea de Scaphis, a deconsecrated 8th-century church, for his Rome location.

Known for amazing exhibitions and even more amazing contemporary artists such as Rirkrit Tiravanija, Urs Fischer, Alex Katz and Ed Atkins, the intimate space hosts site-specific installations as well as multi-work shows.

After GBE, keep on the trail of other emerging artists by visiting Frutta Gallery, Galerie Emanuel Layr and Monitor, and then catch up with contemporary art’s heavy-hitters like Giuseppe Penone, Cy Twombly, Rachel Whiteread, Kiki Smith and Richard Long at Gagosian Gallery and Lorcan O’Neill.

The Streets

Get outside. Everyone knows that Rome is all about life on its streets. Since the days of Julius Caesar, the city has been a hotbed of contemporary art; its walls were canvas to ingenious and indignant graffiti.

Over the centuries street art has painted itself into Roman daily life. From scratchings and tags to gorgeous calligraphy, rebellious stencils and larger-than-life murals, street art is on every corner and every wall, and there is no better area to experience all of it than Quadraro.

A periphery neighborhood outside of the city center, Quadraro has become a full-immersion outdoor museum since artist David Vecchiato (Diavù) launched Museo  del Urban Art MURO in 2010.

Some the best local and international artists including Diavù, Alice Pasquini, Camilla Falsini, Jim Avignon and Zio Ziegler have graced Quadraro’s walls with evocative paintings, transforming Quadraro into living and continually evolving exhibition of incredible street art.

On the hunt for OneMoreDish in Rome

A Very Personal Food Tour of Rome

Finding the very best dish in Rome is a Sisyphean task. Seriously.  Roman food is well represented, and rightfully so - old school, new style, street food, Michelin - all over the city, and lately, there is always something new popping up so searching for "the best" is an endless journey.  A great restaurant in Rome is an always-changing sum of mood, weather, ambition, expectations, patience, hankering, quality, location, ambience and a few more inexplicables that are relevant often only in that particular moment.  With that in mind, I don't look for the Best, I'm looking for an experience and a surprise, like the perfect plate of puntarelle, a surprise sanguinella (blood orange) gelato or a satisfying sandwich, exactly why I jumped to the task when Alexandra Romanoff of OneMoreDish asked me to create a food itinerary for day trip to Rome.

Full Disclosure:  Alexandra is an old friend.  We've been eating together since she lived in Rome a few years back where I quickly understood her vibe on food- a dedication to experiencing as much as possible.  She's a flyweight with the voracity of a T-Rex, and the more I hang out with her, the more I come to think of her a gastronomic John Anderton/Minority Report, preemptively envisioning dishes, snacks, restaurants, and that one more dish days before the table is set.  And Alexandra is OneMoreDish, a fabulous and intrepid food-centric Instagram profile that has been featured in ExtraCrispy, TastingTable, MeatPacking District,  Cosmopolitan, Buzzfeed, Maxim, amnewyork, Refinery29 and more.  For her upcoming visit, I lined up favorite food groups - pizza, pasta, panini and gelato for a day out in Rome.

8 hours, 6 meals and 2 Desserts

Alexandra only has eyes for eating as much as possible, so I focused on efficiency.  Conveniently for us, my backyard at Campo de' Fiori is the perfect place to start any food quest, a central HQ to walk to all corners of Aurelian's Rome.  Our journey took us to stand-up and sit-down spots in Campo, Trevi, Trastevere and Testaccio, and back,  each no more than a 30-minute light strut from my home base.  Grouped by food genre (so you can pick and choose at your fancy), here's where, why and what we ate:

PIZZA

 La Renella A serendipitous blast from the past.  Long ago, when I lived in the neighborhood, I ate a slice of pizza al taglio from Renella everyday, vowing it was the best.  I evenutally moved out of Trastevere and moved on to other forni and panifici, forgetting about my beloved Renella.  Thanks to our spur of the moment food tour,  we short cut through Trastevere's Piazza Trilussa, I found myself walking up via del Moro and enveloped in that mesmerizing freshly baked pizza aroma.  My recall kicked in and Renella became our surprise stop: a slice of pizza rossa (light tomato sauce) with roasted peppers, a smattering of parsley and flakes of fior di latte cheese, which we took to go, enjoying it as we crossed Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere.

Location:  Trastevere

Baffetto 2  Alexandra asked for something light, easy and near by. Easy enough, pizza romana at Baffetto 2.  With so much talk about "the best pizza" in Rome and waxing poetic on flour, I've lost track of where I'm supposed to eat pizza.  Instead, I stick with old faithful Baffetto 2, a no-frills neighborhood pizzeria. We've known the pizzaiolo for a few years and he knows so we like our pizzas extra thin and crispy, so we are never disappointed.  And it constantly stands up to the Bellardini Test, a centuries-old method of assessing dough quality and consistency by holding out a slice out horizontal to see how well and long its holds out [tried and true pefected by Ettore Bellardini of Antiqua Tours ]. Our choice for the quest was an extra crispy pizza bianca (white pizza- cheese with no tomato sauce) and fiori di zucca, zucchini followers with no anchovies (Alexandra's preference, not mine).

Location:  Campo de' Fiori.

Pizza al taglio, by the slice, at La Renella in Trastevere. Photo by Alexandra Romanoff/OneMoreDish

Pizza romana, at Baffetto 2 in Campo de' Fiori. Photo by Alexandra Romanoff/OneMoreDish

PASTA

Roscioli Everybody loves Roscioli.  Over the years, its name  alone has become synonymous with Rome and its food scene as the not-to-miss salumeria.  Roscioli's popularity means advance booking, usually means a week or more ahead of time, or fall in line with the pedestrian-traffic-stopping queue on via dei Giubbonari.   And with good reason: the pastas are to die for.  We snuck in  seat at Roscioli's nextdoor caffe (ask Tommaso for the restaurant menu) and ordered light, choosing caciopepe instead of its award-winning carbonara.  For those who have never tasted caciopepe, it is the ideal comfort food which Roscioli does it to perfection-  freshly cracked black and red pepper, piquant pecorino and fresh pasta.

Location:  Campo de' Fiori

Pipero You knew this was going to be on the list, because I won't let anyone leave Rome without tasting my favorite pasta dish. At this point in life, the only person who I trust to make it is Chef Luciano Monosilio of Pipero. Luciano is a rockstar and magician.  His carbonara is perfectly balanced with pecorino and parmigiano cheese, egg yellows, and guanciale smoked and grilled separately. And Pipero the restaurant is like no other- gorgeous, high ceiling space with Flos lamps and design chairs. What I love best are the tables spaced just enough apart from each other that you can't accidentally eavesdrop, and I feel like the carbonara is all mine.

Location:  Campo de' Fiori/Chiesa Nuova

 Al Moro Okay, I lied.  I also love spaghetti al moro, a piquant twist on carbonara that makes me think of yesteryear dinners with my great aunts, and Jonathan Gold, the LA Times food critic who once dined at Al Moro for 10 days in a row.  I have a routine at Al Moro- carbonara followed by a freshly made zabaglione with melted dark chocolate, but this time happenstance placed a dish of ovoli, those seasonal, crimson-lined mushrooms that Julius Caesar loved, served thinly sliced with shards of grovière, on our table.

Location:  Trevi

Caciopepe from Roscioli Salumeria by Campo de' Fiori. Photo by Alexandra Romanoff/OneMoreDish.

Carbonara at Pipero by Campo de' Fiori. Photo by Alexandra Romanoff/Onemoredish.

Ovuli from Al Moro by Trevi.

PANINI

Volpetti  Alexandra is a New Yorker, which means she has at least one top notch alimentari/ salumeria (delicatessen) in her rolodex.... for every city.  For Romans,  the alimentari is usually sottocasa, (just below the house) or within close walking distance.   While she lived in Rome,  her alimentari was Volpetti, a historic salumeria in Testaccio, slightly out of my comfort zone but worth the walk.   Alexandra customized a prosciutto crudo, mozzarella and pickled artichokes on pizza bread sandwich with a dash of balsamic vinegar.

Location: Testaccio

Panino from Volpetti in Testaccio.

GELATO

 Corona  I love Corona, my tiny neighborhoood gelateria that often is overlooked with all of those overly artisanal ice cream shops populating the city.  The shop is simple, no bells and whistles, just a dozen flavors. Each season and micro-season, owner Alesandro creates new and unique flavors like marron glacè, along with the old staples including stracciatella and cioccolato al latte.  Our choice was a triple scoop of lamponi banane (raspberry banana), cioccolato fondente (dark chocolate) and sesamo (sesame), a bizarre and extraordinarily satisfying combination. 

Location:  Largo Argentina

Fatamorgana is one of those gelateria that has about at least twenty artisanal flavors at any given time, but the difference is that MariaAgnese's recipes are all natural.  Recent unforgettable tastes are wasabi cioccolato, black garlic, lavender,  and peanut.  Fatamorgana is the place if you are looking for variety and unique flavors.

Location:  Trastevere with several locations around the Eternal City as well as an outpost in Studio City, Los Angeles.

Three scoops at Corona in Largo Argentina.

A cone from Fatamorgana in Trastevere. Photo by Alexandra Romanoff/Onemoredish.

 

- by Erica Firpo.  Want to know more about who I am and what I do?  Check out my website ericafirpo.com.  And then click over to Twitter and Instagram  for your Rome and Italy fix. . .

Rome’s Stylish New Lineup Of Tailored Suites

Rome wasn’t built in a day, but it seems as if almost overnight, the city has blossomed with luxury private suites located in historic palazzi and renovated townhouses that all celebrate the art of elegance with made-to-measure experiences and artisan design.

From midcentury to modern, here is our runway of Rome’s top tailored suites:

Villa Spalletti Trivelli
The grande dame of Rome’s luxury suites, Forbes Travel Guide Four-Star Villa Spalletti Trivelli may have been one of the first to take residence in the Eternal City. A private villa in the middle of the urban sprawl, Villa Spalletti enjoys its own garden, subterranean spa and annex apartments along with 11 first-floor suites.

Whereas the trend in high-end suites has been an homage to modern and contemporary Italian design, Villa Spalletti celebrates centuries past with rich fabrics, Titian-hued walls and artworks that are officially listed as Italy’s cultural heritage sites.

Portrait Rome — Lungaro Collection
Sitting on the most coveted corner on Rome’s via dei Condotti, a street lined with every luxury shop imaginable (including Prada, Bulgari, Cartier, Hermès and Céline), the discreet palazzo is the Ferragamo family’s pied-à-terre luxury hotel, Portrait Rome. The 14-room, Five-Star property is a celebration of the Ferragamo lifestyle and Italian artistry, from its custom furniture to vinyl record selection.

A 24-hour lifestyle and guest assistant team is a six-person group made up of multilingual twenty-somethings who curate Portrait’s 20-plus interactive menus, available on iPads for all guests. But the standout here is the rooftop terrace, which puts Rome literally at your feet.

GKK Roma
In the eye of the storm at the center of Rome, the seven-room GKK Roma is an enclave of chic. Around the corner from the monumental Piazza Augusto Imperatore, the two-level townhouse is a step into the 21st century. A superbly decorated lounge and reception area sets the vibe with a balance of contemporary furniture, luxury fabrics and black-and-white artistic prints.

Rooms follow suit with the same stylish aesthetic, though each focuses on a unique theme. The Private Movie Suite, for example, features a 65-inch 3-D screen television with a Dolby surround audio system, a wide selection of movies and its own casting couch, while the Grand Suite Spa takes up a spacious corner with a sitting room, bedroom and marble-lined Jacuzzi spa room.

The H’All
When chef Riccardo di Giacinto and Ramona Anello decided to relocate All’Oro, their critically acclaimed restaurant, they realized they wanted an all-encompassing luxury culinary experience. The duo upgraded a turn-of-the-century villa into The H’All, where wake-up calls include gourmet breakfasts and nightcaps feature fabulous tasting menus.

The 14 rooms and suites are minimalist luxe with white walls, parquet floors, platform beds and gorgeous lamps, while contemporary art pieces (a monthly rotated collection provided by a local gallery) add a pinch of spice to the hallways and rooms.

Palazzo Scanderbeg
For the white-glove treatment, try Palazzo Scanderbeg. The 16th-century palazzo has the privilege of being a stone’s throw from the Trevi Fountain, yet hidden from chaos on a quiet side street.

The historic townhouse feels like a home, a luxury abode with security detail, 24-hour reception and a Renaissance-inspired entrance room bedecked by Italy’s best interior designers. Poltrona Frau chaises, Capellini divan sofas, modern Persian carpets and contemporary artwork adorn each of the 11 luminous and large rooms. The best detail can be found in the Master Suites: full-time butler service.

Fendi Private Suites
Unveiled in 2016, Fendi Private Suites is one of the most fashionable addresses in the city. The seven luxury suites are on third and fourth levels of Fendi’s flagship, a palazzo in the center of Rome.

It’s full fashion immersion from the get-go: framed Fendi design and fur samples mix with museum-worthy art, and the right-off-the-runway concierge team will tell you “everything is possible,” from in-house personal training sessions and makeup artists to private dinners and exclusive tour experiences.

Accommodations are on the smaller side, except for the suites, and are essentially showrooms of Fendi Casa interiors set to rich, neutral colors; crisp lines; hardwood floors; and Karl Lagerfeld’s black-and-white photos of Rome’s iconic fountains.

This article was first published in Forbes Travel, June 2017.