TRAVEL

5 European Cities To Visit In 2019

Prague. Credit: Prague City Tourism

2019 is all about your next European adventure — it’s not just where you’re going but what you’re going to do. We’ve got a lineup of incredible events happening in five of the continent’s most dynamic cities.

Prague
A haven for culture lovers, the Czech Republic hot spot was named a UNESCO Creative City of Literature in 2014, thanks in part to its incredible array of browse-worthy bookshops (the historic city has Europe’s highest concentration of tome-lined storefronts) and literary cafés.

Throughout the year, Prague celebrates its book smarts through a series of festivals dedicated to literature and art, including May’s poetry-focused Microfestival and October’s Prague Writers’ Festival.

Four Seasons Hotel Prague.  Credit: Four Seasons Hotel Prague

Four Seasons Hotel Prague. Credit: Four Seasons Hotel Prague

This article first appeared in Forbes Travel, January 2019.

One of the more delectable draws is the 17-day Czech Beer Festival (May 9 to 25). In recent years, the event has become a culinary attraction, where chefs and restaurants partner to showcase a wide breadth of classic cuisines and pairings.

When you’ve had your fill of local dishes, digest at Four Seasons Hotel Prague, a true Bohemian rhapsody sitting on the Vltava River in Old Town. The posh property is a beautiful labyrinth of the Czech Republic’s varied architectural styles, uniting three historic structures (classical, Renaissance and 18th-century baroque) with contemporary builds to create an irreplaceable compilation both inside and out.

Milan
It should come as no surprise that Italy’s fashion capital is also a top global destination for design. Nothing shows off Milan’s stylish side better than Salone del Mobile (aka Salone), a five-day showcase bringing together the world’s best designers (interior, industrial, fashion, tech and fine arts) in a celebration of upcoming trends and movements.

From April 9 through 14, expect fabulous exhibitions, clever collaborations and electrifying launches as well as coveted parties by artists, designers and fashion houses.

Between gatherings, rest your head at Forbes Travel Guide Recommended ME Milan Il Duca, a stunning, strategically located stay within walking distance of the famous Quadrilatero della Moda (fashion district) and the modern Porta Nuova quarter.

The boutique luxury hotel fits Salone’s vibe well with 132 chic rooms adorned with Molteni&C furnishings and a buzzy rooftop bar.

Altis Avenida Hotel. Credit: Altis Hotels Group

Lisbon
Portugal’s sun-drenched capital has been making its way onto everyone’s travel bucket list over the past few years, and its time you made it to the city. From May 17 to 20, Lisbon hosts Festival Internacional da Mascára Ibérica (International Iberian Mask Festival), a costumed parade and four-day celebration of the historical and cultural ties that exist between Spanish and Portuguese regions.

But if you want a more contemporary vibe, book a weekender in July for Super Bock Super Rock (July 18 to 20), one of Europe’s top music festivals. The 2019 lineup includes Lana Del Rey, The 1975, Metronomy, Kaytranada, FKJ and Superorganism.

Whenever you choose to visit, be sure to book a room in the historic Altis Avenida Hotel. The 1940s-era building charms with art-deco touches, a central locale and the spectacular Rossio rooftop restaurant

Le Richemond Genève. Credit: Genève Tourisme

Geneva
As headquarters of the United Nations, this scenic Swiss city is a cultural melting pot. Just stand on its pristine sidewalks and you’ll hear dialogue in more languages than you can imagine.  

Summer is prime time to visit this mountainside metropolis. Stop by in June to take in the internationally renowned Montreux Jazz Festival (June 28 to July 13), then drive over to nearby Vevey for the epic Fête des Vignerons (July 18 to August 11). Held only five times a century (last celebrated in 1999), this UNESCO-recognized event is Switzerland’s oldest and largest wine festival.  

Perched on the banks of Lake Geneva, Five-Star Le Richemond Genève provides a picturesque respite between outings. With nearly 145 years of history, this is a grand masterpiece of marble floors, gold-filigree finishes and vintage pieces.

Grand Hotel du Cap Ferrat, France. Credit: Manuel Zublena

Cap Ferrat, France
This unspoiled promontory on the French Riviera is a historic haunt for the wealthy and rowdy, including actor Charlie Chaplin, The Great Gatsby author F. Scott Fitzgerald, Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards and U2 front man Bono.

Situated midway between Nice and Monte Carlo, this tiny peninsula offers a gorgeous getaway during the 77th Monaco Formula 1 Grand Prix (May 26 through 29).

Consider Five-Star Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, A Four Seasons Hotel the perfect pitstop between races. This glamorous, 17-acre waterfront retreat puts you just 20 minutes from the glitz of Monaco. You can even organize Riviera boat transfers from the harbor of Saint-Jean Cap-Ferrat to the main event.

Before you make any plans official, remember that the high-end hotel is a seasonal property and closes each winter until March 1. Visit after April 26 to take advantage of its renowned alfresco restaurant, Club Dauphin.

5 Lisbon Hotels We Can’t Wait To Visit

This article original appeared in Forbes Travel, January 2018.

Pousada de Lisboa. Credit: Pestana Group

Mark your calendar for a European getaway this year because it’s all about Lisbon. Portugal’s capital city capitalizes on its coastal locale, a vibrant arts scene and a gorgeous culinary landscape. Here are five properties that will pique your curiosity and leave you with such a sense of saudade that you’ll be longing to come back to the City of the Light before you even leave.

Pousada de Lisboa
If you’re looking for luxury with a side of history, then this Forbes Travel Guide Recommended 18th-century address is for you.

Brazilian interior designer Jaime Morais upgraded the hotel’s 90 rooms to evoke a classic modern-chic style with artistic furniture, restored antique features like chandeliers and stained glass windows, and original works by Portuguese artists selected from local museums. 

The most enticing accommodation at this luxury Lisbon address is the Dom Pérignon Suite, which consists of 1,184 square feet of elegance in the form of a living room, two balconies with panoramic views of the Tagus River and an Irish green marble bathroom bathed in natural light.

Altis Avenida Hotel. Credit: Altis Hotel Group

Altis Avenida Hotel 
This retro-chic hotel is perfectly perched in the middle of everything you want to do in Lisbon. Located at the Praça dos Restauradores and opposite the Rossio train station, Altis Avenida has the city center at its doorsteps and all of the capital’s must-see sites within walking distance, as long as you don’t mind traversing a few hills. 

The throwback art deco décor plays to the hotel’s history as a 1940s office building with a palette of ebonies and ecrus, slick marble, Lucite and a modernist design.

2018 will bring big changes to the property (including 46 more guest rooms in an adjacent building), with all eyes on the soon-to-open rooftop bar and sun deck that surely will be Lisbon’s next hot spot.

Tivoli Avenida Liberdade’s Sky Bar. Credit: Tivoli Avenida Liberdade

Tivoli Avenida Liberdade
Another art deco reboot with a bit more of a modern flair can be found in this newly renovated hotel on Avenida da Liberdade, just below Principe Real park. Its location along this glamorous boulevard offers a straight shot to both the historic center and to the trendy Bairro Alto neighborhood.

After exploring the city, you’ll return to a tranquil retreat. Each of the historic hotel’s 286 rooms is outfitted in a calming blanket of light, muted tones with large, all-white bathrooms.

Explore the property’s verdant gardens to find a hidden oasis, the Tivoli Spa, for elegant pampering and a circular swimming pool set below the shade of palm fronds.

The perfect spot for a sip can be found on the rooftop Sky Bar, offering some of Lisbon’s best sunset views.

Martinhal Lisbon Chiado Family Suites. Credit: Martinhal Lisbon Chiado Family Suites

Martinhal Lisbon Chiado Family Suites
If you’re traveling with tots in tow, you may want to try this residential-style Lisbon retreat. The surprisingly upscale property offers 37 chicly designed suites in a 19th-century palazzo.  Martinhal’s cheerful aesthetic is a celebration of bright colors, vintage cartoon posters and classic toys, with a sophisticated style that will please parents.

Location is key — these sumptuous suites are in the very family-friendly Chiado neighborhood lined with cafés, shops, boutiques and restaurants. Popular sites such as the National Azulejo Museum and the lively Mercado da Ribeira food hall are just a short walk away as well.

Four Seasons Hotel Ritz Lisbon’s Central Lap Pool. Credit: Four Seasons Hotel Ritz Lisbon

Four Seasons Hotel Ritz Lisbon 
The luxury Four Seasons brand consistently follows through on its philosophy of white glove service, ever-present staff and immaculate facilities. Its Lisbon incarnation does not sway from this line of thinking. 

The 10-level, retro-modernist building is situated on the northern edge of Lisbon’s Marques de Pombal square — a nice walk to the historic center and art museums — overlooking the open greens of Eduardo VII Park. Its 282 rooms and four suites are done in opulent Louis XVI-style with 18th-century replica furniture, jewel-toned carpets and spacious marble bathrooms. 

Though noted for its spa and 59-foot wooden-decked central lap pool, the hotel also boasts a scenic rooftop running track that traces the perimeter of the building for a one-of-a-kind workout.

7 Rome Exhibitions You Don’t Want To Miss

This article was first published in Forbes Travel, December 2017.

he Canvas That Is Rome. Credit: patrizio1948

From monumental to peculiar, and ancient to contemporary, Rome has it all for art aficionados. And thankfully, there’s no better time than right now to traverse the Eternal City and catch up with these not-to-be-missed exhibitions.

History comes alive
If there is one thing ancient Rome was known for, it was making a colossal impression. And no emperor did it better than Trajan, whose two decades in the city expanded the empire beyond anyone’s wildest dreams.

Archaeological site Mercati di Traiano (Trajan’s markets) showcases the emperor’s imperial advances — from infrastructure and economic services to architectural and urban development — in “Trajan: Building the Empire, Creating Europe,” on display through September 9.

Peruse Picasso
Bring yourself back to the modern age by visiting “Picasso: Tra Cubismo e Classicismo 1915-1925” at the Scuderie del QuirinaleThe exhibit explores the fantastic mind of the artistic genius in a display of 100 works that visually catalog his 1917 Italian travels with playwright Jean Cocteau as they searched for inspiration by following Sergei Diaghilev’s touring ballet company throughout the country.

Drawings, watercolors, sketches and stage costumes on display through January 21 honor the centenary of their auspicious journey.

A post shared by MAXXI (@museomaxxi) on

Revel in the Renaissance
Through February 11, the beautiful and historic Palazzo Barberini plays host to “Arcimboldo,” an exhibition of 20 works by 16th-century Lombard painter Giuseppe Arcimboldi. His paintings are an exploration of creative portraiture using objects such as flowers, fruit and animals.  Accompanying Arcimboldi’s amazing efforts are 100 pieces by his contemporaries.

Meanwhile, across town, Galleria Borghese is celebrating its beloved Baroque artist Gian Lorenzo Bernini with 60 treasures that join the galleria’s already substantial collection of Bernini sculptures in a spectacular feature exhibition, on display through February 4. 

Check out contemporary culture
While Rome may be the world’s best open-air museum of ancient monuments and Baroque palaces, it is also a tiny hub of contemporary art. “Home Beirut. Sounding the Neighbors” is the third part of the internationally acclaimed Maxxi Museum’s series Interactions across the MediterraneanThe installment focuses on the contemporary art scene in Beirut, Lebanon, through four variants of the concept of “home” seen through the eyes of 36 artists, musicians, publishers, designers and filmmakers, on display through May 20. 

And for a different take on a museum experience, the tiny Chiostro del Bramante asks you to “Enjoy” art in an interactive exhibit of installations, optical illusions, paintings, sculptures and videos all meant to be played with. This amusing display is available through February 25.

Fornasetti At Palazzo Altemps. Credit: Palazzo Altemps

The best of both visual worlds
For a fun-and-fabulous mix of modern design, ancient art and Renaissance beauty, catch Fornasetti a Palazzo Altemps. Through May 6, be spellbound by art and design pieces from whimsical Italian artist/interior decorator Piero Fornasetti that intermingle with the Palazzo Altemps’ incredible collection of Greek and Roman sculpture displayed in the palace’s resplendently decorated Renaissance rooms.  

There's Something About Florence

IMG_3804.JPG
A version of the article appeared in Forbes Travel, October 2017.

There’s something about Florence.  Birthplace of the Renaissance, Dante’s hometown, font of the Italian language, and constant ranking in the top three places to visit on the Grand Tour, or better yet, the Bucket List.  Florence has had it going on for centuries, and it relishes in its rep as the Cradle of Modern Culture for nurturing homegrown artists like Michelangelo, Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, and Leonardo da Vinci, as well as earning the title as the fifth fashion capitol thanks to bi-annual Pitti Uomo and several pioneering tech meets fashion/luxury summits. Maybe it's the proud Roman in me, but for years, I've written off Florence as a "mausoleum" or "cute tourist town", a necessary stop on your whirlwind Italy tour and a great place for a photo op, giving it only a bit of cred for its awesome art collection. Lately, however, I''m thinking otherwise-  Florence is fabulous. 

What changed my mind? Well, a little bit of handholding by local champions Georgette Jupe-Pradier, GirlInFlorence and Coral Sisk, CuriousAppetite, and here I am,  celebrating the town the Medicis built because of its, here we go, 21st century incarnation.  To the visible eye, nothing has changed in Florence but what is makes the city so invigorating is its community of artists, makers, creators and entrepreneurs who are putting a new perspective on a charming town.  According to Jupe-Pradier, who dedicates her blog GirlInFlorence  to the city’s contemporary stories and makers, there is a palpable city revival the “celebrates the past with a willingness to evolve and inspire especially in new contemporary spaces and artisans”.  Is it a 21st century Renaissance? I don't know but I'm liking the vibe.

Window Shopping

It took me a while to learn that Florence is far more than Via Tornabuoni and the Ponte Vecchio.  Jupe-Pradier's favorite area of the city is her backyard-  the Oltrarno, the river Arno’s left bank.  Ever since she started her blog, she encouraged exploration of the literal “other side” and her Oltrarno love concentrates around San Frediano which she brought to the pages of Lonely Planet as one of the world's coolest neighborhoods. I tagged along as she made afternoon rounds, stopping in to personally talk with every shop owner and artisan in the area.  Favorites include & Company a beautifully curated boutique for design lovers where you can find vintage furniture, hand-crafted stationery, Blackwing pencils and original creations by calligrapher and co-owner Betty Soldi.  Officine Nora, a working studio for a collective of jewelry makers where I picked up a handmade silver necklace by Valentina Carpini whose filigree work is divine,  Il Torchio- bookbinder studio and shop filled with luscious handcrafted books, restorer Jane Harman's  eponymous boutique Jane H where she features her original wood designs , and Albrici, a decades-old antiques shop with wing devoted to vintage clothing and accessories.

Earthly Delights

Catherine de' Medici, the woman who upgraded French cuisine by introducing Italian, in particular Florentine,  recipes and the fork to France, would be proud of her native city.   A collection of sturdy stalwarts, including  Cibreo and the century-old Trattorio Sergio Gozzi, are stewed in Florentine tradition, as long as you can get a table.  Perennially positive Jupe-Pradier loves the family Trattoria Sabatino in San Frediano, Oltrarno for its sixty-year-long dedication to serving seasonal, local dishes. .

Tradition aside,  intrepid food writer and culinary guide Sisk says “the city is responding to a demand for a more dynamic food scene”.  Club Culinario Toscano da Osvaldo ranks high on her list of Florentine eateries for its strong ethos on ingredient sourcing and traditions. And she loves modern bistrot-bar Zeb Gastronomia for its daily home made pastas and cool modern design, while her contemporary/creative dining picks are Michelin starred Ora d'Aria and Cibleo, Cibreo's Asian-Tuscan fusion.

For a taste of Florentine luxury, Il Locale is the spot- a restaurant and bar in a Renaissance palazzo designed as a modern Medici court with decoupage walls and velvet damask, sandstone columns in sandstone, vintage design pieces and contemporary sculptures. (Note:  I had great drinks but service was delayed, so I opted out of dining.) Charming Bar e Cucina is modern retro.  Designed by Paolo Capezzuoli, (aka Zero T, who collaborated the  Rock Steady Crew!), the vibe is a Golden age diner meets Florentine caffè, the perfect pit stop during those days at Pitti Uomo.

Just desserts at Trattoria Sabatino.

Eye Candy

Along with the usual suspects (we’re looking at you, David), Florence likes to keep you entertained with exhbitions and museums that traipse between traditional and unexpected.  Opened in 2005, Palazzo Strozzi, a fabulous example of 15th century palazzo architecture is a dynamic cultural foundation whose exhibition line up includes the ongoing Radical Utopias (design and architecture movement from the late 1960s), as well as previous blockbuster ringers like Bill Viola, Ai Wei Wei.  A blast from the past and my personal meditation is Museo di San Marco, a former Dominican convent now museum with the most extensive collection of in situ Fra Angelico frescos, and Jupe-Pradier loves the Museo del Novecento, a museum dedicated to 20th century Italian art.

Radical Utopias, courtesy of Palazzo Strozzi.

View from the Hotel Savoy.

Pillow Talk

Where you rest your head in Florence is just as important as what you do. For a stunning Renaissance-meets-modern stay, head to Four Seasons Hotel Firenze. This gorgeous urban resort complex features two refurbished buildings in which you can drift off to sleep — the 15th-century Palazzo Della Gherardesca or the former 16th-century convent, the Conventino.  For center stage its Hotel Savoy is Florence’s grande dame, whose timeless elegance yet au courant chicness redefines the meaning of “historic.” Savoy’s enviable Piazza della Repubblica location puts in the very center of everything.  Hotel Brunelleschi captures the best of Florentine architecture in a labyrinth of Renaissance-era palaces and medieval towers. And if it’s good enough for an overnight stay for Robert Langdon, Dan Brown’s prolific The Da Vinci Code protagonist, it should be an adventure.

4 Places for an Unforgettable Breakfast in Rome

We all know Italians love to do everything to the fullest, especially when it comes to food. Around Rome especially, lunches and dinners are fanciful feasts of antipasti, primi, secondi and dolci, tragically leaving la colazione (breakfast) as gastronomically penurious in comparison.

Caffe e cornetto — espresso coffee and a small Italian croissant — quickly ingested at the local bar is the typical morning routine, but lately languorous sit-downs with sweet and savory menus have been slowly making their way into the Roman colazione scene — almost rivaling the Full English.

Here are our favorite spots for breakfast in Rome.

All’Oro
When chef Riccardo di Giacinto decided to open his own boutique hotel The H’All Tailor Suite earlier this year, one of the first things on his mind was creating a space for his restaurant, All’Oro. And the second? Creating a world-class breakfast menu curated for international travelers and Rome residents, of course.

All’Oro’s à la carte menu celebrates the best of Italy alongside dishes from the U.S. and U.K. The abundant offerings include housemade jams and pastries such as croissants, maritozzi (a Roman bread bun filled with light cream), bombe (deep-fried dough with cream), Italian cheese, sliced-on-the-spot prosciutto and a customizable listing of dishes such as scrambled or poached eggs alongside bacon, toasts, pancakes, French toast and a selection of di Giacinto’s favorite champagnes.

Served in the downstairs dining room or outdoor garden, The H’All’s breakfast is luxurious and relaxed, ideal for a leisurely morning.

Le Panier
For those looking to stay in, you’ll want to click around the website for Le Panier, a gourmet breakfast delivery service that knocks on your front door exactly when you want with your well-curated morning meal.

In the kitchen is Tommaso De Sanctis, a classically trained chef who creates clever (and mouthwatering) dishes like pancos (a savory pancake soft taco) and wellness-focused menus like the Hangover.

De Sanctis and partner Giovanna de Giglio source organic produce, eggs and dairy for all dishes; make juices in house; and work with local artisanal producers for their jams, yogurts, porridge, granola, breads and pastries.

Il Giardino Ristorante
If you want breakfast with a view in Rome, there’s but one proper address for doing so: Il Giardino Ristorante at the Forbes Travel Guide Five-Star Hotel Eden.

Following a nearly two-year renovation of the property, the open-air establishment rebooted its look and gave adored chef Fabio Ciervo full reign to make over every single menu, from the breakfast sides to dinner entrées.

Ciervo chose to focus his new concept on wellness, and you can thank a master’s degree in nutrition and a love for organic, Italian produce for the delectable detour. The breakfast buffet, for example, is a cornucopia of treats, from housemade breads and pastries to eggs, yogurts, jams and a bevy of vegan options.

Those looking to juice need to look no further than chef Ciervo, who continues to squeeze as much deliciousness as possible into his liquid treats.

Caffe Canova Tadolini
Here’s a tip for those whose only breakfast needs are a super-sized caffeine fix: though the true Italian cappuccino comes in only one size (the standard coffee cup), Caffe Canova Tadolini, a posh café in the Piazza di Spagna neighborhood, serves its pours in oversized cups — perfect for those needing an extra boost before heading out in the morning to explore the city.

In between sips, you’ll notice a dash of culture found in the building housing the eatery, which was once the home and atelier to artists Antonio Canova and the Tadolini brothers. Their work can be admired in the café’s museum.

- This article was originally published in Forbes Travel on May 31, 2017.

3 New Rome Restaurants, Forbes Travel

Spending Two Perfect Days in Milan

 

Spending Two Perfect Days In Milan

 

This article first appeared in Forbes Travel in April 2014

By Correspondent Erica FirpoSpending Two Perfect Days In Milan - Forbes Travel GuideMilan

Milan may be Italy’s fashion capital, but don’t let its reputation for style distract you — the northern city is home to some of the country’s best art galleries and museums for modern and contemporary art. On top of that, it’s quietly hosting a burgeoning restaurant renaissance as well. With only 48 hours to explore it all, here’s the best way to sample a bit of everything.

Spending Two Perfect Days In Milan - Forbes Travel Guide

Duomo

Day One

The first thing you’ll want to do upon arrival is park your bags at the fabulous Hotel Principe di Savoia — don’t worry, you’ll have plenty of time to enjoy the luxurious property a bit later — and grab a set of wheels from BikeMi, Milan’s citywide bike-sharing program (sign up in advance), to go over to the Piazza del Duomo. The Museo del Novecento there has an incredible collection of Italian art from the late 1880s to the end of the 20th century. Keep your eyes out for The Quarto Stato, the epic Giuseppe Pellizza da Volpedo painting that sets the stage for Italy’s turn-of-the-century social revolution. After admiring the pieces, make your way to the Duomo, Milan’s gothic cathedral, before 6 p.m., for a walk (or elevator ride) up to the rooftop to view the city and take in a sunset through the 18th-century spires.

Once you freshen up back at your room, head out for an evening in Navigli, Milan’s nightlife neighborhood of quaint canals, great cocktail bars and amazing restaurants. Carlo e Camilla in Segheria is the area’s latest dish. The shabby-chic spot — with long family-style tables illuminated by Venetian chandeliers — is in a former woodworking factory. Acclaimed chef Carlo Cracco created an enviable menu of contemporary Italian cuisine that includes dishes such as spaghetti alici, lime e caffè (spaghetti with anchovies, green onions, lime and coffee), and riso al salto, acqua di pomodoro, stracciatella e basilico (a kind of flipped risotto with tomato, stracciatella cheese and basil). Navigli is charming, so walk around the area for more neighborhood flavor before finally making your way to Mag Cafè, a place known for top-notch cocktails from bartenders Flavio and Matteo.

Spending Two Perfect Days In Milan - Forbes Travel Guide

Hotel Principe di Savoia

Day Two

If you’re an early riser, head to Principe di Savoia’s rooftop fitness area, Club 10, for a morning run, swim or sauna. Keep in mind, Club 10 has a spa that offers face and body treatments — the reflex zone massage sounds especially appealing after so much walking the day before — that will be great for an afternoon relaxation session. If you are ready for breakfast, the hotel’s ground-floor restaurant, Acanto, overflows with delicious foods, including local jams and honey, breads and salmon. Acanto’s chefs are also in tune with guests who have dietary concerns.

For a glimpse at 1930s Milan, trek over to Villa Necchi, a beautiful private-home-turned-museum designed by Milanese architect Piero Portaluppi, and used as a backdrop in Luca Guadagnino’s 2009 film I Am Love. After taking in the sights, head over to your noon appointment at Santa Maria della Grazie to see Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece Il Cenacolo (The Last Supper). You must make a reservation to see the mural. Visits last only 15 minutes so, if you are a serious art aficionado, book two back-to-back sessions. If it’s a sunny day, plan to picnic in Parco Sempione. Otherwise, have pranzo (lunch) at LadyBù, a great bistro with a focus on mozzarella along with traditional risotto and pasta.

Of course, there is no Milan without fashion, so plan on spending the entire afternoon walking around Via Montenapoleone and the surrounding streets. This is the city’s fashion epicenter with haute couture’s favorite names (Gucci, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo) running up and down the manicured roads.

You’re going to need a break from the shopping eventually. When that happens, step into Cova, one of the city’s oldest cafés and a constant social scene. The desserts are divine (try the budino di riso, or rice pudding) and cocktails are stylish (like the Negroni sbagliato, which swaps prosecco for gin in the classic Italian drink), but you’re there for the people-watching. Note: Cova is cash only so make sure to hit the ATM before arriving.

Swing back to the hotel and make sure to rest up. Dinner will be across town at Wicky’s, a modern Japanese restaurant led by chef Wicky Priyan who, interestingly enough, holds a criminology degree from his home country of Sri Lanka. We know what you are thinking — “A Japanese restaurant from a Sri Lankan chef in Italy?” The fact is that Milan is undergoing a food revolution with a slew of amazing, international restaurants, led by creative chefs, popping up all over. Spend the evening admiring the culinary grace, unless, of course, you have hard-to-score tickets for a production at La Scala.

Photos Courtesy of iStock, Markus Mark and Principe di Savoia