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The Best Hostels in Rome

Generator Rome

The Best Hostels in Rome first appeared in The Telegraph, February 2018. I've updated my article with a little background.

I know what you are thinking.  Or better yet, I know what you are feeling. The mere mention of the word hostel sends shivers down my spine, too.  I get full sensory nostalgia, I think of that creepy-crawly feeling when some one rustled through my backpack in the middle of the night in a 12-person dorm in Berlin, then my ears fill will grating waling (not mine) while I was locked in a small room in a women’s sanatorium in Genova, and finally, I get heat flashes remembering from languid evenings in Siem Reap with politics, playing cards and pot.

Yep, I am from The Beach generation of backpackers, when hostels were cheap and cheerful.  Design and amenities weren’t even part of the dialogue because back then.  It was a cash-only culture of affordability (about $8/night) where the return was only convenience, conversation and a blind step to the next adventure.  Hosteling in 2018 is nothing like the 1990s, and we have social media to thank for that.  Hostels are curated with gorgeous community spaces meant for hang out instead of get out.  No longer lounges of left-over books, architecture and cheap service, hostels are destinations and experiences worth sharing, and better yet, worth posting.  Savvy owners/managers are well-informed of that insta-promotion clicks bring in more, and they are more and more unified in their goal for full (and at times personal) service and great, okay, decent design.   For the Telegraph, I had fun writing about the best hostels* in Rome and are the answers two questions my friends always asked while researching:

Generator Rome.

Why a hostel and not a hotel, bed and breakfast or AirBnB?   Hosteling is all about personal choice.  You want to maximize your euro, dollars and dirham, by saving on services. And for the low price, there is a built-in social scene, which is what the 21st century hostel owners/management are counting on.  Community Experience -  from lounges to bars, hairdresssers, cooking classes, climbing walls and more, hostels are creating environments, and places like The Yellow  are creating worlds. 

Isn’t a hostel only for 20-somethings?  Not at all.  Because of the global market, i.e. everyone wants to and can travel (somewhat) affordably, smart hostels are savvy to all generations with services and boarding choices - private rooms, all female dormitories, family suites with bathrooms and kitchens.

Some hostels like Next Generation declined to participate in this review. I do think it’s worth a look.

From The Telegraph. . . .An insider's guide to the top hostels in Rome, including the best for affordable prices, private rooms, shared dormitories, boutique style and sociable atmospheres in locations such as the Monti neighbourhood and near to the Termini station.  

Generator Rome.

Generator Rome

Rome, Italy

8 Telegraph expert rating

Rome’s first 'poshtel' is a chic, boutique accommodation with a youthful vibe and a contemporary-meets-retro décor. It is on par with a decent design hotel. The location is slightly out of the way, but nevertheless close to the city's lively Monti neighbourhood and with excellent transport links at nearby Termini Station. A tranquil palette of forest greens, violets and light grey colour all rooms, whose only furniture include cosy white linen beds, vintage-style desks, lamps and armoires. The 12 dormitories have a maximum of four beds each, while the remaining 53 are private rooms with double beds.Read expert review

The Yellow

The Yellow

Rome, Italy

8 Telegraph expert rating

Rome’s premier party hostel is ideal for travellers in their 20s looking for a comfortable bed and an interactive social scene. It has a creative and artsy vibe, and a rooftop terrace and small garden hang-out for film screenings during the summer months. The 95 rooms are divided into dormitories and private rooms (doubles, triples and quads) with a total of around 320 beds. Dorm options include mixed or female-only, with en suite or shared bathrooms. Overall décor is a chic minimalist. It's just a 10-minute walk to Termini train station.Read expert review

The Blue

The Blue Hostel

Rome, Italy

8 Telegraph expert rating

Seven heavenly-styled guest suites in a former convent, housed in a 17th-century palazzo around the corner from the Monti neighborhood. Rome's main railway station, Termini, is just round the corner, providing excellent transport links to the rest of the city. Each of the rooms are tastefully decorated with handmade, upholstered headboards, framed black and white photos, original artwork and vintage desks and chairs. En-suite bathrooms are stocked with HG Bigelow hair and body care products. All rooms have air-conditioning, Wi-Fi, heating, mini fridges, coffee makers and televisions.Read expert review

Hostella

Hostella

Rome, Italy

7 Telegraph expert rating

A cheap and cheerful women-only hostel with a casual and homely vibe, offering simple dormitory accommodation. It's located close to Rome’s Termini Station, so well placed for exploring the city or striking out to see the surrounding countryside. There are six shared dorm-style rooms (in two apartments) accommodating three to four beds each. Décor is simple, with Ikea beds, desks and cabinets with locks, and all have air-conditioning and heating. There are four shared bathrooms (three with showers); Room Six, a spacious loft conversion, has an en suite.Read expert review

The Bee Hive

The Beehive

Rome, Italy

8 Telegraph expert rating

A boutique hostel with a whimsical style and an eco-conscious vibe. The Beehive's many personal touches give it the feel of a home away from home. Close to the Termini Station, the hostel is excellently situated for transport links in and out of the city. Of the Beehive’s 12 rooms, 10 are private and two are shared dormitories sleeping four. They are quiet, airy and spacious, exhibiting a simple design, with one or two pieces scattered about, like intricate ceramics by a local Italian artists and small furniture pieces from the owners' travels to Bali. All rooms have Wi-Fi, fans and heating.Read expert review

Alessandro Palace

Alessandro Palace

Rome, Italy

8 Telegraph expert rating

This is one of Rome’s original hostels; a no-frills dormitory with an active social scene that draws in a young crowd. It's within walking distance of Termini Station and enjoys excellent transport links to the rest of the city. Friendly staff members organise on-site events that keep the sociable atmosphere bubbling. Communal areas have kitschy charm with their Ancient Rome-inspired murals. The 120 beds are spread across dorms sleeping two, four, six and eight (mixed and women-only, spartanly decorated, with en suite and shared bathrooms), and private rooms in the Annex, a separate apartment building.

Alessandro Downtown

Alessandro Downtown Hostel

Rome, Italy

7 Telegraph expert rating

A nuts and bolts hostel, centrally located in Rome’s Esquilino neighborhood and in close proximity to the vibrant Monti neighbourhood, as well as the transport hub of Termini Station. Like its counterpart Alessandro Palace, the Downtown has the same cheap and cheerful hostel dormitory vibe. The 20 rooms are vaguely reminiscent of university dorms – no design style, just bunk beds (four, six or eight), simple table and chairs, and storage lockers. Several rooms have en-suite bathrooms, and if not there are communal bathrooms – both mixed and female-only – just like the dorm options.Read expert review

Top 10: The Best Hotels Near The Trevi Fountain

  

By Lee Marshall, destination expert  and Erica Firpo, travel writer. 

An expert guide to the best Rome hotels near the Trevi Fountain, including the best places to stay for comfy rooms, intimate restaurants, rooftop terraces and relaxing spas, in locations that are ideal for seeing Rome's many sights, such as the Spanish Steps, the Pantheon and the Colosseum. 

Crossing Condotti

Crossing Condotti,  Telegraph expert rating: 8/10

Crossing Condotti,  Telegraph expert rating: 8/10

A quiet haven located in Rome's bustling but still villagey fashion-shopping district, eight-room Crossing Condotti has the simplicity of a B&B but the panache of a luxury hotel. The décor is a beguiling, tasteful mix of antique and contemporary, with fine bed linens and textiles creating an aura of discreet opulence. All rooms feature warm parquet floors, a sprinkle of antique furniture, paintings and prints, crisp white cotton sheets and duvets, and bold-striped fabrics. Read expert review 

Hotel d'Inghilterra, Telegraph Expert Rating  8/10

Hotel d'Inghilterra, Telegraph Expert Rating  8/10

Hotel d’Inghilterra

Historic credentials, a location right in the heart of the boutique-lined former artists’ quarter at the foot of the Spanish Steps, and an intimate, clubby atmosphere make this Roman luxe townhouse hotel a bit of an insider option that inspires fierce loyalty among its many aficionados. There are 88 rooms, and none of them feel like a carbon copy of any of the others – after all, this is a hotel that has been undergoing constant nips and tucks since opening in 1845. Upholstered bedheads, silk curtains and lots of antique polished wood set the tone; the more recently renovated rooms on the fourth floor espouse a lighter, more classic-contemporary look.Read expert review

Hotel dei Borgognoni

Hotel dei Borgognoni, Telegraph Expert Rating 7/10

Hotel dei Borgognoni, Telegraph Expert Rating 7/10

It really doesn’t get better than via del Bufalo, a calm pedestrian street at the heart of the city's historic centre. The famed shopping area Piazza di Spagna, with streets via dei Condotti and Via del Corso, is within a five-minute walk, and likewise monuments, piazzas and famous art collections like the Pantheon, Trevi Fountain and Galleria Colonna are a quick few steps down the road. Each of the hotel’s 51 rooms and suites are different variations of the same classic contemporary style - neutral printed wallpaper, queen-sized beds with upholstered headboards, rich blue or red colour accents, and early- to mid-century vintage desks. 

Residenza Napoleone III

Residenza Napoleone III, Telegraph Expert Rating 8/10

Residenza Napoleone III, Telegraph Expert Rating 8/10

Some hotels model themselves on stately homes or aristocratic townhouses; Residenza Napoleone III is one. The owner, Principessa Letizia Ruspoli, has created a single guest apartment out of a whole suite of rooms, where the Emperor Napoleon III once stayed, on the piano nobile of her opulent family abode. The Old Master paintings you see on the walls, the busts of Roman emperors that line the grand entrance staircase, the heirloom antiques that decorate the place – all these things have been in the Ruspoli family for generations. But this is no draughty castle – it feels warm despite the grand setting. The Roof Garden Suite is an intimate, cultured refuge surrounded by greenery with 360-degree views over the domes and rooftops of central Rome.Read expert review

Hotel Modigliani

Hotel Modigliani, Telegraph Expert Rating 8/10

Hotel Modigliani, Telegraph Expert Rating 8/10

As comfortable as any in the city, this hotel mixes artsy bohemianism — distilled in the ubiquitous reproductions of paintings by the artist it’s named after — with traditional mid-range hotel décor. The whole place is decorated with reproductions of Modigliani paintings and prints, plus creative contibutions by guests themselves. The 23 rooms are clean and functional, old-fashioned without being démodé. There are also two small apartments – the garden one is perfect for families. Rome 602, the Honeymoon double, has marvellous views. It's just down the road from the busy transport hub of Piazza Barberini, and Via Veneto, the Trevi Fountain, the Spanish Steps and the fashion shopping district are just a short walk away. Read expert review

Hotel Parlamento

Hotel Parlamento, Telegraph expert rating 7/10

Hotel Parlamento, Telegraph expert rating 7/10

You could hardly get more central than the Parlamento, just along from Montecitorio, home to the lower house of the Italian parliament, and within five minutes’ walk of the Spanish Steps, the fashion shopping district, and the Trevi Fountain. Not everyone will get this two-star’s shabby-chic charm – it’s basically a neat, clean and friendly fourth-floor boarding house, accessed via a cramped antique lift – but those that do will love it. The cute roof terrace is the icing on the cake – lined with plants, with views across rooftops and churchtowers, this is a charming refuge from the street-level bustle.Read expert review

CasaCau

Casa Cau, Telegraph expert rating 8/10

Casa Cau, Telegraph expert rating 8/10

Contemporary cool and well-placed by Trevi Fountain, living a 21st-century dolce vita is the modus operandi of CasaCau. Restaurants, shops, cultural sites, markets, schools and homes surround the six-apartment boutique hotel so the three-day minimum stay required here is a full-immersion experience. CasaCau’s apartments are known as Interiors, six unique and individual living-spaces designed and curated by Roman architect Nora P. Contemporary art hangs on the walls, while lacquered tables and stools made of recycled materials by artist Alfred van Escher pepper the living spaces.Read expert review

Portrait Roma

Portrait Roma, Telegraph expert rating 8/10

Portrait Roma, Telegraph expert rating 8/10

This 14-suite bolthole, a short sashay from the Spanish Steps, is one of the city’s most stylish luxe options, lent panache by Michele Bonan’s tasteful contemporary-retro design scheme. The discreet service, courtesy of a dedicated ‘lifestyle team’, is unparalleled. The spacious, well-appointed suites feature rich fabrics that play off against austere earth tones in walls and carpets, and there are fun little touches like video fireplaces. There’s no restaurant, but they do have one of Rome’s most panoramic roof-terraces, where aperitivos can be enjoyed of an evening, and where you can choose to have breakfast served if you don’t want it in your room.Read expert review

Hotel Stendhal

Hotel Stendhal, Telegraph expert rating 8/10

Hotel Stendhal, Telegraph expert rating 8/10

One of those quiet, off-the-radar hotels – Hotel Stendhal is a one-two punch of effortless style and ease of location, perfectly situated for a walk to any historic centre monument. Radiating a turn-of-the-century elegance, the hotel’s seafoam-blue wall colour complements its antiquarian furniture, original wainscoting, vintage prints and paintings, neoclassical sculpture casts and amazing Art Deco bar, while the Annexe cools it down with a more minimalist modern atmosphere. The best of the rooms is the Royal Suite, a corner apartment in black and white that feels like an art gallery and has a view of Piazza Barberini.Read expert review

Villa Spalletti Trivelli

Villa Spalletti, Telegraph expert rating 9/10

Villa Spalletti, Telegraph expert rating 9/10

An antique- and art-stuffed palazzo, complete with elegant formal garden, that has been in the same family for over a century . The hotel's opulent interiors are of such historic significance that they are listed by the Italian heritage ministry. The twelve first-floor bedrooms are warm and welcoming with their rich fabrics, pastel hued walls and bedcovers, Fiandra linen sheets and alpaca or cashmere throws. The Villa’s huge spa includes a wonderful Turkish bath, along with a gym and a range of enticing treatments. Between the bus-plied shopping street of Via Nazionale and the presidential palace (Il Quirinale), the Villa is well-placed for pretty much everything.Read expert review

Hotel Raphael

raphael
raphael

Reviewed for t

he Telegraph: Hotel Raphael,

Rome, Italy

Hotel Raphael is a Rome hotel offering a fantastic rooftop terrace, newly renovated rooms, a gym, and a restaurant, in an enviable central location near Piazza Navona.

Expert Rating: 9/10

It’s all about the rooftop. With a 360-degree, eye-level view of the domes, bell towers and rooftops in Rome’s historic centre, the Hotel Raphael has long been the city’s most coveted spot for a sunset cocktail. Though the hotel likes to maintain ties to tradition with its refined style, an award-winning architect recently took over its executive suites to add a contemporary spin on luxury.

Location:  10/10

Hotel Raphael is, in my opinion, one of the best-located hotels in Rome, if not the best. It is in a charming square behind Piazza Navona, which means it is quick to enter as well as escape the Rome chaos. Hundreds of the city’s eateries vie for table time in the surrounding, so it is easy to find a bite, though you will have to look harder for a great restaurant.

Style/character: 9/10

Once upon a time, Italy’s ill-fated Prime Minister Bettino Craxi called a cosy top-floor apartment at Hotel Raphael home, thanks to its luxe design and perfect location, in terms of the Senate and Parliament buildings. A few years later, Craxi was all but forgotten when award-winning starchitect Richard Meier overhauled two of its floors in minimalist luxe. And thus you have the dual nature of the Hotel Raphael — contemporary yet old-school, private yet super-star, emphasised in the ground-floor art collection which shows off Mirò, Morandi, and De Chirico paintings, ceramics by Picasso, Roman antiquities and Mayan artifacts.

Service/facilities: 9/10

Hotel Raphael’s coup de foudre is its rooftop terrace, La Terrazza, where you sit shoulder-to-shoulder with all of the city’s domes and campaniles from nearby Church of Santa Maria della Pace (and its Bramante-designed cloister) to Michelangelo’s cupola. For the day’s exercise, the small Pantheon fitness centre is outfitted with ever-popular Technogym equipment, whereas the ground-level library is fully stocked with art books and novels for a more mental work-out. Like all five-star hotels, the hotel has a full-loaded concierge staff, each with an answer to any and every question, as well an arsenal of suggestions for what to do in Rome and how. Parking is available in a nearby garage.

Rooms: 

9/10

Traditional or contemporary? All 65 rooms and suites are bright, with light wood, soft umber, tasteful decorations and a splash of colour, but whereas the Classic Rooms are decorated with Renaissance-inspired tapestries and columns, wooden furniture and velvet curtains, the Richard Meier Executive Suites are minimalist harmonies of glass and wood panelling, black leather sofas and Carrera marble bathrooms. If you desire a piazza view, ask in advance as some rooms face the former architecture of the neighborhood’s 15th-century alleys. However, those looking for a bit of privacy should request the Richard Meier Executive Suite with the Terrace, primarily because the nook terrace is all yours.

Food & drink:  9/10

Though the rooftop is best known as a great aperitivo spot, the hotel’s La Madre Terra takes residence during warm weather months. The menu is a sanctuary for anyone with a food intolerance: the Mediterranean cuisine is entirely interpreted in vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free recipes. Though most would agree that a Bellini on the terrace is the perfect way to celebrate the sunset, keep you eyes on the wine list - Hotel Bramante stocks a very full wine cellar of Italian, European and off-continent labels.

Value for money: 10/10

Double superior rooms from £170 in low season; rising to £232 in high. Breakfast included. Free Wi-Fi.

Access for guests with disabilities? Yes.

Family-friendly? Yes. Concierge will organise customised children’s tour itinerary, and babysitting services are available upon request.

Hotels: Rome's Babuino 181 reviewed for the Telegraph

Up next for The Telegraph's Travel:   Babuino 181 I have begun contributing hotel reviews for The Telegraph's travel section, and I am having a blast revisiting Rome's hotel hospital, with my mind focused on detail, style, vibe, and experience, of course.  This time, it's Babuino 181, a boutique hotel on my favorite via del Babuino, Rome's uber-fab shopping street.  Keep your eye here and on the Telegraph as I continue to roll out reviews.

Babuino 181 first appeared in The Telegraph in August 2015.

breakfast-terrace-babuino-500x416
breakfast-terrace-babuino-500x416

Babuino 181 is a boutique Rome hotel offering attentive service, Art Deco interiors, a rooftop terrace, breakfast, and spacious suites, in Rome’s fashion district, near Piazza del Popolo, Piazza di Spagna and Piazza San Lorenzo in Lucina. The chic, pied-a-terre vibe of Babuino 181 is key to its top ranking as Rome’s best and most discreet hideaway. Sitting pretty on coveted a shopping street, via del Babuino, Babuino 181 enjoys privacy and privilege as it hides in the shadows of the haute couture windows of Valentino, Chanel, Herve Leger and Moschino.

 

Location 10/10

The very epicentre of contemporary Rome, especially for the shopping set. The fashion triangle that extends from Piazza del Popolo to Piazza di Spagna (Spanish Steps) and Piazza San Lorenzo in Lucina includes boutiques, antique shops, art galleries and caffès. Only pedestrian traffic and nominal vehicular movement here, so days are quiet and evenings are even more so. Most monuments and sites are a short walk away including Piazza Navona, Ara Pacis, Pantheon, Trevi Fountain, Piazza Venezia, and greenery getaway Villa Borghese, meanwhile a visit to the Vatican and Termini station takes only a few metro stops.

Style/character 10/10

A home away from home, especially when put together by a fabulous Italian man who has lived in the area for decades. Babuino 181 owner, Alberto Moncada di Paternò, and one of his well-informed concierges skip formalities and welcome guests in a chic mezzanine lounge. The intimate vibe is emulated in Babuino 181’s Back-to-the-Future décor. Original ornament details, such as the townhouse’s restored marble staircase and cast-iron railing, and Art Deco reproductions intermingle with contemporary art and photographs, while the earth-tone palette keeps the vibe calm and cosy.

Service/facilities 9/10

Since it is all about feeling at home, Babuino 181’s concierge staff are available 24/7 and to your convenience to chat about what your heart desires — whether in the room or out — such as tour planning, babysitting and shopping. The glass-enclosed rooftop terrace is a private enclave for hotel guests, and hosts an Italian breakfast of pastries, cheeses, cured meats, yogurt and fruit, and afternoon-to-evening cocktails.

Rooms 9/10

The 14 rooms and suites are dreamy hideouts of Frette linens, king-sized beds, comfortable couches, large windows, and natural woods blending with the hotel’s delicious warm tones of umbers, ochres and beiges. What makes each room unique is location, view and size, so be picky and ask questions. The entry-level double superior can be up to 280 square feet, and may or may not have a great view, while the Patrizi Suite (my favourite) enjoys nearly 600 square-feet of bedroom, living room, and terrace with a great rooftop view.

Food & drink 8/10

Though continental breakfast is served on the rooftop, there is no on-site restaurant at Babuino 181, but thankfully, the hotel is within walking distance of several trattorias. For a nightcap, head to Babuino’s rooftop terrace and peruse the cocktail menu.

Value for money 9/10

Classic Double rooms from £214 in low season; rising to £290 in high. Breakfast included. Free Wi-Fi.

Access for guests with disabilities?

Yes.

Family-friendly?

Yes. But it is worth noting that only a handful of suites can accommodate four people. Babysitting is available upon request.

Hotels: Rome's historic Hotel Hassler reviewed for The Telegraph

This summer, I began contributing hotels reviews for the Telegraph's Travel section.  For me, it is the  fun fusion of getting in depth with the Rome's hospitality service and enjoying my extraordinarily picky self.   Each hotel comes from a selection chosen by both me and my editor and is based on my personal experience.   My method is a regime of open-mindedness, questions of the "ask as much as you can", experience and attention to detail.   Over the next few months, I will share my Telegraph reviews with you, and you can find them as well on The Telegraph. The Hotel Hassler review was first published on August 1, 2015 in The Telegraph.

hassler
hassler

Hotel Hassler is a Rome hotel offering Belle Époque grandeur, impeccable service, a wonderful 1940s bar, Michelin-starred restaurant, stylish bedrooms and a central Rome location, near Piazza di Spagna, Trevi Fountain, Ara Pacis and Piazza Navona.

Expert Rating 9/10 Rooms from £265

With its more than 120-year history as one of Rome's original hotels, Hotel Hassler maintains its title as the city’s Grand Dame with impeccable service and unforgettable style. Centrally-located, the Hassler is classic Rome - a larger than life personality in its 96 rooms, looming presence above Piazza di Spagna neighbourhood and Michelin-starred panoramic restaurant. What brings the Hassler charmingly down to earth is its very personalised service, time-capsule 1940s bar, bespoke concierge-curated activities and very stylised modern rooms.

Location 10/10

Above Rome’s historic high-end shopping district Piazza di Spagna, the Hotel Hassler is within walking distance to several historic sites including the Trevi Fountain, Ara Pacis, Piazza Navona, Villa Borghese and, of course, the famed Via dei Condotti.

Style/character 9/10

The Hassler style is a mercurial mix of original Belle Époque grandeur and a contemporary revisit of Art Deco, as curated by Astrid Schiller Wirth. Classic rooms are accented with vintage wooden furniture and antiquities (the hotel is built on the Republican era Horti Lucullani), while the bold contemporary counterparts have brightly coloured bolted furniture, linear dark panels and Swarovski accents, including recessed ceiling lights.

Service/facilities 8/10

The hotel’s original 19th-century concierge desk in the hotel lobby sets the stage for the Hassler “grand hotel” service–focus, which is formal and precise. The Hassler’s key amenities include the Rossano Ferretti Hair Salon, an in-house salon under the watchful eye of Italy’s top colourist and style maker, and is located in the alcove above the concierge station. On the third floor, there is the small Amovero spa and gym - best with reservations for time in the hot sauna or on the treadmill. On site trainers are available by request.

Rooms 9/10

You should be picky when choosing one of the Hassler’s 82 rooms and 14 suites. Room décor lends to either traditional classic, hearkening on the 120-year Hassler history, or contemporary Art Deco, as per the precise eye of Schiller Worth. Classic suites like the Grand Deluxe Double Forum are time-pieces with 18th- and 19th-century wooden and marble furniture, while the modern interpretations are styled in a minimal Art Deco with black, white and red accents. My personal favourite is the Grand Deluxe Trinità dei Monti Suite on the fifth floor, with its sweeping view of Rome’s cityscape and five balconies. If the view is your main requirement, and it should be, the best can be found from street-facing rooms on the fourth floor and above. It’s worth noting that every Hassler bathroom is unique, whether classic or modern, with lavish marbles and mosaics.

Food & drink 9/10

For the nearly a decade, the Michelin-starred restaurant Imagò has reigned on the Hassler’s sixth floor with its spectacular panoramic view and equally spell-binding Italian-fusion cuisine. Helmed by chef Francesco Apreda who collaborates with Hassler general director Roberto Wirth on consultancy restaurants in India and Tokyo as well, the seasonal Imagò menu is Apreda’s emotional take on contemporary nouvelle Italian cuisine inspired by his experiences in hometowns Naples and Rome, and travels throughout New York, Tokyo, London and Mumbai. Marble and mirrors play off the contemporary Rococo design. The cocktail set loves to primp over a light lunch or aperitivo at the Palm Court – a quaint garden bar with a mindboggling, oversized oyster cascading the bar. My secret spot, rain or shine, is the Hassler Bar, a time-capsule annex of red leather bar stools and curved banquettes. A bountiful buffet breakfast, offering the very best of continental desires as well as savory Italian style treats is served in the reception room of the Sala Vietri bar and garden bar Palm Court, in summer months.

Value for money 8/10

Double rooms from £265 in low season; rising to £450 in high. Breakfast included. Free Wi-Fi.

Access for guests with disabilities?

No.

Family-friendly?

The Concierge service focuses on little and not-so-little ones with bespoke tours to showcase the Eternal City for your child, as well in-room pampering with small-size robes, and handpicked snacks and treats.